Women in Critical Care Medicine

2/16/2019
Roundtable Discussions will be making their return to the 48th Critical Care Congress. The Women in Critical Care Roundtables will cover a variety of topics related to advancing women in critical care.
 
Roundtable Discussions will be making their return to the 48th Critical Care Congress. These moderated discussions create opportunities to discuss critical care topics and network with peers on a variety of professional, career, and leadership subjects, including women in critical care.
 
Led by Roshni Sreedharan, MD, and Marie R. Baldisseri, MD, MPH, FCCM, the Women in Critical Care Roundtables will cover a variety of topics related to advancing women in critical care, including:
  • Finding your voice
  • Identifying mentors and sponsors
  • National organization engagement and networking
  • Showcasing your potential and worth
  • Investing in your professional development
The group of clinicians who support critical care medicine are as diverse as the specialties that make up the field. With a growing awareness of diversity in the workplace, it is important to have conversations about how to create inclusive environments.

“Women have achieved so much in the past few decades—some of which has come to the forefront. Unfortunately, a large part of it goes unrecognized due to the roles assigned to them,” shared Dr. Sreedharan. “My experience overall has made me realize what unconscious bias is and why directed efforts need to be put into the advancement of women in medicine,” she said, speaking firsthand to the challenges women face in critical care.

As recognition grows about the disparities that exist for women in the workplace, it is important to take this opportunity to discuss ways to advance and support women in critical care.

Noting the importance of her network of mentors and colleagues, both men and women, Dr. Sreedharan said, “I had (and still have) an incredible tribe of women physicians I work with, and strong department and institute chairs, who truly care about and support the advancement of women.” Her institution, the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, is also taking steps to address diversity in the workplace. Through its Women’s Professional Staff Association (WPSA), it offers a platform for concerns about gender parity and bias to be brought forth and discussed.

“Having these open discussions, mentoring, and opportunities have helped me envision a career path, which would not have happened if not for these people in my life,” Dr. Sreedharan said. “I want to pay it forward, increase the awareness that gender disparity exists and help uplift more women.”